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    ABOUT US

    We give information and advice to schools on supporting children with medical or mental health conditions

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  • CHALLENGES

    CHALLENGES

    Practical advice on supporting children with the challenges they face at school

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  • CONDITIONS

    CONDITIONS

    Information and advice on specific medical and mental health conditions

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  • RESOURCES

    RESOURCES

    Resources we have found useful

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    CONTACT

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ADVICE TO SCHOOLS FROM YOUNG PEOPLE

NEWSLETTER

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Read our latest NEWSLETTER Spring 2018

YOUR QUESTIONS

How do schools help children with cystic fibrosis and what support do they get?

How do schools help children with cystic fibrosis and what support do they get?

How do schools help children with cystic fibrosis and what support do they get?

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My daughter has selective mutism

My daughter has selective mutism

I have been saying on and off for the past two years that my daughter has selective mutism but only in occasional situations outside home and at school. It’s perhaps gone on too long as it has not really been picked up by teachers.It came to a head on Wednesday when the head mistress gave a detention for not completing her maths work and only achieving one sum when to me this seemed harsh and also she must have been struggling to ask for help. Where do I get a formal diagnosis as for two years in her report they have labelled her stubborn and she is obviously uncomfortable in some situation. At home and in familiar surroundings she is fine but school isn't one of them. Please help!

It must be stressful for you all at present. The first thing we always suggest, if you haven’t already, is trying to talk directly to school, perhaps meeting with the SENCo to discuss your concerns. If you feel that you are not able to progress your concerns with school and you would like to talk to a Child and Adolescent Mental health (CAMHs) professional regarding your concerns you can pursue this through your GP. Alternatively you may find it helpful to call the Youngminds helpline: http://www.youngminds.org.uk/for_parents/parent_helpline We have had very positive feedback from families that have used this service.

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My daughter became ill and has not really attended school since

My daughter became ill and has not really attended school since

My daughter is 16, and started her A level course this year. Last year she became ill and has not really attended school since. She sat her GCSE's in the medical room crying. She's only attended school about 5 days in total this term.
The hospital are doing tests to find out what the problem is. She is in constant pain, and I'm at a loss what to do. I constantly contact the doctors and the hospital for answers, but all the time she is sick she is not at school. All the while they are looking into her illness, she is missing vital lessons. The school have been great, sending work home, but I’m worried they'll lose patience with her, and even though she works hard, she's losing vital interaction with her teachers. I'd appreciate any advice you can give.

Your situation sounds very stressful for you and your daughter. The situation you describe and the feelings you have at the moment are not uncommon. It sounds as if your daughter’s school is supportive by sending work home. Please do not feel that this is a favour, all schools have a duty to support access to education for students with a medical condition. The school should have a policy on this and certainly your education authority should have a policy statement. If you have not already met with the school to discuss the current situation and your concerns I would suggest that you do this. This meeting could be with the Head of 6th form and the schools special Education Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO). At this meeting you could discuss the best way for your daughter to plan her time in relation to the subjects she is studying at A level. It may be helpful to focus on one or two subjects until she is well enough to attend school regularly. Having subject teachers email addresses so that work can be sent for marking and your daughter can ask questions about specific tasks could be helpful. Having access to text books and other teaching resources can be discussed. Also, do you have a school learning platform so that lesson notes and resouces can be accessed by your daughter when at home?  Talking to the subject teachers directly can help in making sure that your daughter can undertake tasks appropriate to studying independently. With the rapid development of online teaching resources working independently when your daughter is feeling well enough can be interactive and fun. Stress about falling behind is not going to help. We suggest that the key thing to remember is that if the situation continues and daughter continues to miss a lot of school now, all is not lost. Many students spend more than 2 years getting their A levels and universities will take into consideration personal circumstances when looking at applications. (If university is something she wishes to pursue) If the situation continues and ultimately she needs to take more time to get her A levels, please be assured we have worked with many students at the hospital school who have been in this situation but have ultimately been successful, it’s just taken a bit more time and organisation.

 

 

 

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PSYCHOSIS - symptoms, treatments and specific advice to schools on supporting students with psychosis.… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…

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